IllinoisHumanities

When we hear that someone has “served their time”, many think that they have paid their debt to society and have been granted the permission to re-enter society.

While this is partly true, a more accurate reality is although individuals have been released from a correctional facility with wardens, cells and bars, many still don’t feel free. Some of the formally incarcerated population feel shackled,  by  their limitations to the labor market. Others feel imprisoned by the barriers to the housing community. While others feel constricted because they have been denied the right to vote.

The discussion in the Bronzeville Hub will explore what is needed to provide the formerly incarcerated “Living Room”. What are the barriers that exist to this population experiencing a full life after they have completed their sentence behind bars? What changes need to be made to be sure that they are not continuing to be incarcerated by invisible bars.

This conversation will also take some of the barriers into consideration through the lens of Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow.”